Ethical Considerations in Cultural Neuropsychology: What Every Practitioner Needs to Know

Thursday, June 15, 2017
1:00pm – 2:30pm Eastern time
1.5 CE Credits

Presented by:
April D. Thames, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor-in-Residence | Wilder Scholar in Neuropsychology
Director, Social Neuroscience in Health Psychology (SNIHP) Lab
Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences
University of California Los Angeles

This course is designed to provide an overview of ethical principles and conduct that are tailored to the specialty practice of cultural neuropsychology. Participants will gain knowledge of the key ethical issues/dilemmas that are likely to emerge in the professional practice of neuropsychology when working with diverse populations. Culturally diverse populations will include those with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) as well as those from educationally and socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds. This course will provide participants with an opportunity to enhance their own professional competency by developing problem-solving skills which reflect the application of ethics.  Practical examples of dilemmas and solutions will be discussed to aid practitioners in performing culturally informed neuropsychological evaluations.

 After the webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. List the legal and ethical principles that govern professional practice in the specialty of cultural neuropsychology.
  2. Explain how to apply these ethical principles to relevant legislation and codes of professional conduct concerning such issues as confidentiality, informed consent, freedom of information, and intra- and inter-professional relationships and responsibilities.
  3. Summarize the key intercultural and ethnic issues that impact neuropsychological practice.
  4. Identify and describe ways to achieve professional competence in performing culturally informed neuropsychological evaluations.

Target Audience: Practicing neuropsychologists and psychologists; pre-doctoral and postdoctoral neuropsychology trainees

Instructional Level: Intermediate to Advanced

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Registration closes 30 minutes prior to the live presentation.


April D. Thames, Ph.D.
is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Director of the Social Neuroscience and Health Psychology laboratory at the University of California Los Angeles. After receiving her doctorate degree, she completed a 2-year postdoctoral fellowship in clinical neuropsychology at UCLA. Now as an Assistant Professor, Dr. Thames is the Principal Investigator of several National Institute of Health (NIH) grant-supported projects, including an NIH (K23) career development award.  This support has helped her to develop a translational research program in social neuroscience that focuses on the impact of HIV/AIDS, aging, substance abuse, socioeconomic disadvantage, and race/ethnicity on neurological and neurobehavioral outcomes. She has also published and is actively involved in studies that have examined psychosocial factors that obscure the validity of neuropsychological test performance among underrepresented ethnic/racial minority groups. Dr. Thames also serves as Member at Large for the American Psychological Association’s Society for Clinical Neuropsychology, and served as past Chair of SCN’s Ethnic Minority Affairs Committee (EMA).

Introduction to Assessing Change in the Individual Patient (Part 1)

Thursday, June 29, 2017
2:00pm – 3:30pm Eastern time
1.5 CE Credits

Presented by:
Kevin Duff Ph.D.
Professor of Neurology
Clinical Neuropsychologist
Center for Alzheimer's Care, Imaging, & Research
University of Utah

Repeated neuropsychological assessments are frequently used in clinical practice to track progression of an illness or chart response to an intervention. However, the interpretation of repeated cognitive test scores can be tricky, and there is limited guidance on this topic. This webinar will introduce attendees to basic concepts associated with change, including test variables (e.g., reliability, practice effects), testing situation variables (e.g., retest interval), and individual variables (e.g., demographics, clinical conditions). Participants will also be introduced to common methods of assessing change (e.g., alternate forms, reliable change index, regression-based change formulae). Case examples will be used to guide the presentation.

After the webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the role that test variables, testing situation variables, and individual variables have on assessing cognitive change.
  2. List common methods for assessing change in patients.
  3. Compute and apply basic mathematical formulae for assessing cognitive change.

Target Audience: Practicing clinical and research neuropsychologists of all levels, including students and trainees, who are interested in better evaluating cognitive change in their patients or as part of research protocols.

Instructional Level: Introductory

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Registration closes 30 minutes prior to the live presentation.


Kevin Duff, Ph.D.
has specialized in neuropsychology for over 15 years. In 2009, he joined the University of Utah, where he is currently a Professor of Neurology and neuropsychologist for Alzheimer’s Care, Imaging and Research. He obtained his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the State University of New York in Albany. He completed his neuropsychology internship at the Southern Arizona Healthcare System in Tucson, AZ, and his post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City. He joined the Psychiatry Department at the University of Iowa in 2003, where had clinical and research responsibilities working with patients with dementia, Huntington’s disease, and a variety of other neuropsychiatric conditions. His current research has focused primarily on the early identification of cognitive decline in neuropsychiatric illnesses. Dr. Duff’s work has been widely published in scientific journals and he has lectured nationally and internationally on his areas of expertise. His research on Mild Cognitive Impairment has been funded by the National Institutes of Health since 2005.

Advanced Topics in Assessing Change in the Individual Patient (Part 2)

Thursday, July 20, 2017
2:00pm – 3:30pm Eastern time
1.5 CE Credits

Presented by:
Kevin Duff Ph.D.
Professor of Neurology
Clinical Neuropsychologist
Center for Alzheimer's Care, Imaging, & Research
University of Utah

Serial neuropsychological assessments are complicated to interpret due to practice effects, regression to the mean, and “normal” change in clinical conditions. This webinar will build on the “introductory” session and address more nuanced issues in assessing cognitive change. It will start with a quick review of common statistical formulae for determining change (reliable change index, regression-based change formula), using case examples to demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of each method. It will also address more complex issues in assessing change (e.g., applying methods to individual tests vs. an entire battery, examining change across more than two assessments, determining whether ±1.645 is the best cutoff, externally validating change scores). The webinar will end with a “call for future research,” as we discuss necessary future steps in the advancement of this area.

After the webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. Compare a wider range of mathematical formulae for assessing cognitive change.
  2. Apply methods for determining change in varied clinical scenarios.
  3. Discuss and explain critical issues in the advancement of this area in the future.

Target Audience: Practicing clinical and research neuropsychologists of all levels, including students and trainees, who are interested in better evaluating cognitive change in their patients or as part of research protocols. Taking the introductory session or having some existing knowledge of this topic area would be helpful.

Instructional Level: Advanced

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Registration closes 30 minutes prior to the live presentation.


Kevin Duff, Ph.D.
 has specialized in neuropsychology for over 15 years. In 2009, he joined the University of Utah, where he is currently a Professor of Neurology and neuropsychologist for Alzheimer’s Care, Imaging and Research. He obtained his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the State University of New York in Albany. He completed his neuropsychology internship at the Southern Arizona Healthcare System in Tucson, AZ, and his post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City. He joined the Psychiatry Department at the University of Iowa in 2003, where had clinical and research responsibilities working with patients with dementia, Huntington’s disease, and a variety of other neuropsychiatric conditions. His current research has focused primarily on the early identification of cognitive decline in neuropsychiatric illnesses. Dr. Duff’s work has been widely published in scientific journals and he has lectured nationally and internationally on his areas of expertise. His research on Mild Cognitive Impairment has been funded by the National Institutes of Health since 2005.

Clinical Trials Research: What’s in it for Neuropsychologists?

Wednesday, August 16, 2017
12:00pm – 1:30pm Eastern time
1.5 CE Credits

Presented by:

    Robin C. Hilsabeck, Ph.D.
Senior Clinical Scientist, INC Research
Clinical Associate Professor, University of Texas – Austin 
     
    David Williamson, Ph.D., M.B.A.
Medical Science Liaison, Janssen Scientific Affairs
Adjunct Associate Professor, University of South Alabama 
     

Clinical trials research is a large industry with multiple players, including pharmaceutical and biotech companies, contract research organizations, clinical research sites, and various vendors who offer specialized services (e.g., rater training, neuroimaging, genetic testing). While neuropsychologists typically do not learn much about clinical trials research during training, neuropsychologists are well-suited for a career within this industry. The purpose of this webinar is to introduce neuropsychologists to the basic terminology and structure of clinical trials research and to review functions and roles of key players. Opportunities for neuropsychologists within clinical trials research settings will be discussed, as well as knowledge and skills that contribute to success in the clinical trials industry and related corporate settings. Avenues for pursuing practice and career opportunities in clinical trials research settings will be provided.

After the webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. Summarize the four phases of clinical trials research.
  2. Explain the roles of two key organizational players in clinical trials research.
  3. Describe three functions of rater training vendors.
  4. List knowledge and skills that help ensure success in clinical trials research settings.

Target Audience: Neuropsychologists, psychologists, advanced trainees in psychology, and other professionals interested in clinical trials research

Instructional Level: Introductory to Intermediate (some prior knowledge of research terminology, typical scales used in clinical research, and neuropsychological constructs is expected)

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Registration closes 30 minutes prior to the live presentation.


Robin C. Hilsabeck, Ph.D., ABPP
earned her Ph.D. in clinical psychology with a sub-specialization in neuropsychology from Louisiana State University.  She completed an internship in clinical neuropsychology at University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and a 2-year postdoctoral fellowship in neuropsychology at University of California, San Diego Medical Center.  Dr. Hilsabeck is a board certified clinical neuropsychologist who works at a large, global contract research organization, INC Research, as Senior Clinical Scientist in the CNS Business Unit.  She is also Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at University of Texas – Austin and maintains a small private practice.  Prior to joining INC Research in 2012, Dr. Hilsabeck worked for 13 years in clinical, administrative, and academic research positions, most recently as Associate Professor of Psychiatry with tenure at University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio. Prior to that, she was Director of the Neuropsychology Residency Program and Neuropsychology Service at South Texas Veterans Health Care System in San Antonio.  Dr. Hilsabeck currently serves as Associate Editor for The Clinical Neuropsychologist and is on the editorial boards of Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology and Neuropsychology Review.  She is Past President of the National Academy of Neuropsychology (NAN).

David Williamson, Ph.D., M.B.A. holds a B.A. in Psychology from Duke University, received his graduate and post-doctoral training in Clinical Neuropsychology and Medical Psychology at the University of Florida and the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, and obtained his MBA from LeBow School of Business of Drexel University.  He is certified by the American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology, and he is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the National Academy of Neuropsychology. He has published in the areas of traumatic brain injury, ADHD, dementia, epilepsy, assessment of suicidality, and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. He currently works as a Medical Science Liaison for Janssen Scientific Affairs, consults on issues of cognitive assessment in drug development and clinical trials, and is Adjunct Associate Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology at the University of South Alabama.  He serves as an ad hoc reviewer to Epilepsia, the Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Child Neuropsychology, The Clinical Neuropsychologist, and the Journal of Attention Disorders