Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE): What We Think We Know and What We Need to Know Next

Thursday, May 17, 2018
12:00pm - 1:30pm Eastern time
1.5 CE Credits

Presented by:
Robert A. Stern, Ph.D.
Professor of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Anatomy & Neurobiology
Clinical Core Director, BU Alzheimer’s Disease Center
Director of Clinical Research, BU CTE Center
Boston University School of Medicine

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease found in individuals with a history of exposure to repetitive head impacts (RHI), such as former American football players and boxers. Referred to as “punch drunk” or dementia pugilistica since the early 20th century, the term “CTE” has been used since the 1950s to describe the clinical and neuropathological changes seen in individuals with RHI exposure. However, it is only in the past 8-10 years that CTE has received increased attention due to a growing number of deceased former NFL players being diagnosed with the disease postmortem. The tremendous growth in media attention to CTE, however, has outpaced the growth in scientific understanding of CTE. As with other neurodegenerative diseases, at this time CTE can only be diagnosed by neuropathological examination. However, provisional clinical research diagnostic criteria have been proposed and studies are underway to develop neuroimaging and fluid biomarkers to detect and diagnose CTE during life. This webinar will provide an overview of what is currently known about CTE, as well as current and future directions in research.

After the webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the neuropathological and clinical features of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).
  2. Describe the possible fluid and neuroimaging biomarkers for CTE.
  3. Explain the current limitations of making a clinical diagnosis of CTE.

Target Audience: The target audience includes practicing neuropsychologists and clinical neuroscience researchers, as well as advanced trainees.

Instructional Level: Intermediate

NAN members login and non-members create an account to:


Registration closes 30 minutes prior to the live presentation.


Robert A. Stern, Ph.D. received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Rhode Island. He completed his predoctoral internship training under Dr. Edith Kaplan at the Boston VA Medical Center and his post-doctoral fellowship at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. He is currently Professor of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Anatomy & Neurobiology at Boston University (BU) School of Medicine, where he is also Director of the Clinical Core of the NIH-funded BU Alzheimer’s Disease Center, and Director of Clinical Research for the BU Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Center.  A major focus of his research involves the long-term effects of repetitive head impacts in athletes, including the neurodegenerative disease, CTE.  He is the lead co-principal investigator of a $16 million NIH grant for a multi-center, longitudinal study to develop methods of diagnosing CTE during life as well as examining potential risk factors of the disease. Dr. Stern’s other current major area of funded research involves the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. He has published on various aspects of cognitive assessment and is the senior author of the Neuropsychological Assessment Battery (NAB), as well as the Boston Qualitative Scoring System for the Rey-Osterreith Complex Figure.  He has received numerous NIH and other national grants and he is a Fellow of both the NAN and the American Neuropsychiatric Association. Dr. Stern has over 175 peer-reviewed publications, is on several journal editorial boards, and is the co-editor of two upcoming books: Sports Neurology (part of the Handbook in Clinical Neurology series published by Elsevier), and The Oxford Handbook of Adult Cognitive Disorders. He is a member of the medical advisory boards of several biotech/pharma companies as well as the Mackey-White Health and Safety Committee of the NFL Players Association and the Medical Scientific Committee for the NCAA Student-Athlete Concussion Injury Litigation.

Clinical Neuropsychology and Technology: What's New and How We Can Use It

Wednesday, August 29, 2018
2:00pm - 3:30pm Eastern time
1.5 CE Credits

Presented by:
Thomas D. Parsons, Ph.D.
Director, Computational Neuropsychology and Simulation (CNS) Laboratory
Professor of Psychology
University of North Texas

Although today’s neuropsychological assessment procedures are widely used, neuropsychologists have been slow to embrace technological advancements. The neuropsychological assessment procedures most commonly in use represent a technology that has barely changed since the first scales were developed in the early 1900s. Furthermore, clinical neuropsychologists are increasingly asked to make predictions about the impact of a given patient’s neurocognitive abilities and disabilities on everyday functioning. After a brief review of current neuropsychological assessments, there is an exploration of novel technologies (e.g., virtual reality environments) for enhanced neuropsychological assessments.

After the webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss the history of computerized testing and how these developments shaped the present status of automated assessment. 
  2. Describe the ways that current and developing technologies can enhance traditional methods of neurocognitive assessment going forward.
  3. Explain how virtual environments and scenario-based assessment can enhance the evaluation of patient capabilities and provide data with increased ecological relevance. 
  4. Discuss the benefits of incorporating computational neuropsychology and data analytics to address diagnostic and assessment issues.

Target Audience: Clinical Neuropsychologists and clinical psychology students

Instructional Level: Intermediate

NAN members login and non-members create an account to:


Registration closes 30 minutes prior to the live presentation.


Thomas D. Parsons, Ph.D. is a Clinical Neuropsychologist, Professor of Psychology, and Director of the Computational Neuropsychology and Simulation (CNS) Laboratory at the University of North Texas (UNT). Prior to joining the faculty at UNT, Dr. Parsons was an Assistant Professor at the University of Southern California's Institute for Creative Technologies. Much of Dr. Parsons's research integrates neuropsychology, psychophysiology, and simulation technologies for novel assessment, modeling, and training of neurocognitive and affective processes. He is a leading scientist in this area and he has been PI of 17 funded projects during his career and an investigator on an additional 13 funded projects. In addition to his patents for eHarmony.com's Matching System (U.S. Patent Nos. 2004/6735568; 2014/0180942 A1), he has invented and validated virtual reality-based assessments of attention, spatial abilities, memory, and executive functions. In addition to his five books, he has over 200 publications in peer reviewed journals and book chapters. He has served as Associate Editor for Frontiers in Psychiatry, Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, and the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. His contributions to neuropsychology were recognized when he received the 2013 National Academy of Neuropsychology Early Career Achievement award. In 2014, he was awarded Fellow status in the National Academy of Neuropsychology.