Spring 2024 Course Schedule

  • Behavioral & Cognitive Neurology - course ends March 26, 2024
  • Clinical Neuroanatomy - course ends April 16, 2024

       

Summer 2024 Online Course Registration Opens March 5

NEW! Fundamentals of Forensic Neuropsychology

16 CE Credits (course begins May 1, 2024 ends June 26, 2024)

This 8-week course is designed to introduce neuropsychologists to forensic evaluation in both criminal and civil litigation. Participants will be familiarized with the United States legal system structure, and relevant case law and legal and practice considerations for forensic neuropsychological (FNP) engagement. Coursework will focus on key terms and processes in FNP evaluation, with emphasis on the differences between forensic and traditional clinical neuropsychology practice. Participants will learn essential elements of select criminal and civil forensic neuropsychological evaluations, and an overview of important components of forensic neuropsychological report writing and testimony. The aim of this course is for the neuropsychologist to understand their potential to uniquely contribute to the legal system and to be aware of the requisite foundational knowledge for moving forward in this specialty niche. Another objective is for the participant to gain not only empirical knowledge, but also to be able to apply this knowledge in real-world scenarios. Ethical as well as equity, diversity, and inclusivity considerations will be discussed throughout the course.

COURSE DIRECTOR 

Chriscelyn M. Tussey, Psy.D., ABPP
Forensic & Clinical Neuropsychologist
Board Certified in Forensic Psychology
Principal, Metropolitan Forensic & Neuropsychological Consultation, PLLC
Clinical Instructor, New York University Grossman School of Medicine
Adjunct Professor, New York University

View Course Syllabus  and DistanCE Policies 

Neuropsychology of Epilepsy & Epilepsy Surgery

16 CE Credits (course begins May 1, 2024 ends June 26, 2024)

This 8-week course will systematically review the major seizure disorders and syndromes. Students will learn how diagnostic tests, such as EEG and structural neuroimaging, are used in epilepsy evaluations. In addition, leading treatment options, including pharmacologic therapies and surgery, will be reviewed. Special emphasis will be placed on the known cognitive and behavioral consequences of specific epilepsy syndromes and antiepileptic drugs. Discussion of the role of neuropsychological assessment in epilepsy diagnosis and treatment will include pre  and post surgical cognitive evaluation, cortical stimulation mapping, functional neuroimaging, and the intracarotid amobarbital (Wada) procedure. The cognitive and psychiatric disorders in epilepsy (including psychogenic nonepileptic seizures) will be considered. 

COURSE DIRECTOR 

Gregory P. Lee, Ph.D.
Retired Professor of Neurology, Neurosurgery, & Neuropsychology 
Medical College of Georgia and Barrow Neurological Institute 

View Course Syllabus and DistanCE Policies 

Behavioral & Cognitive Neurology

24 CE Credits (course begins May 1, 2024 ends July 24, 2024)

The goal of this 12-week course is to provide students with an overview of the behavioral geography and large scale networks of the brain and to review the disorders of higher cortical functions and the major neurobehavioral syndromes, including frontal lobe syndromes, hemispheric asymmetries, attention and confusional states, memory and amnesias, aphasia and related disorders, affective prosody and aprosodias, disorders of complex visual processing, and the dementias.

COURSE DIRECTOR 

Gregory P. Lee, Ph.D.
Retired Professor of Neurology, Neurosurgery, & Neuropsychology 
Medical College of Georgia and Barrow Neurological Institute 

View Course Syllabus and DistanCE Policies 

Clinical Neuroanatomy

30 CE Credits (course begins May 1, 2024 ends August 14, 2024) 

The goal of this 15-week course is to provide students with a working knowledge of the basic neuroanatomic structures of the central nervous system including the motor system, somatosensory system, cranial nerves, cerebellum, basal ganglia, limbic structures, ventricles, meninges, and the vascular supply of the brain. After each major system, structure, or anatomical pathway is presented, the consequences of damage to that system will be presented. These are referred to as “Key Clinical Concepts” in your textbook and throughout these modules. Furthermore, clinical cases will be presented to help solidify the anatomical facts. In this fashion, the neuroanatomical details will take on clinical relevance, and thus a deeper appreciation of how the central nervous system operates will hopefully be attained.

COURSE DIRECTOR 
 
Gregory P. Lee, Ph.D.
Retired Professor of Neurology, Neurosurgery, & Neuropsychology 
Medical College of Georgia and Barrow Neurological Institute 

View Course Syllabus and DistanCE Policies